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More interview techniques and tips

So you had the interview, you felt it went well, and yet there has been no feedback.  Worse, you notice that the job is still being advertised.   What now?

Before you leave the interview, ask a few key questions, eg
  • What is the process after this round of interviews?
  • Will there be a second interview, or have I met all the decision makers already?
  • When will a decision be made?
  • What is your preferred method of follow up? Phone call or eMail?
  • When would be the best time for me to follow up?
After the interview, there are a few nice touches that will keep you top of mind.  First, send the organiser of the meeting a brief thank you note, stating that you enjoyed the time spent with the company, and believe that you would be a good fit, based on the interview and confirming that he/she said that you would hear from the company within a time frame.   And second, if you have committed to send through further details, do so when promised.

Not hearing within the promised time frame is not necessarily bad news, there could be a number of unforeseen challenges which have pushed out the response time.   Not less than 2 days later, give the company a call, and ask whether a decision has been made, and share that this position is your first choice.

Should you not get the position, ask for advice.    Some questions are:

  • Are there any criteria that you can share with me, that I did not meet?
  • Was my asking salary in the ballpark for the position?
  • Did I come over positively in the interview?
  • Does my cv create the right impression, or does it need more fine tuning?
  • Would I be considered for positions in the future?
  • If not, is there anything you can suggest that I do, that would change this decision?
Every interview is an opportunity to build up your network, your knowledge about yourself and your personal brand, and create a positive impression.   Remember that jet stream you are leaving behind you, and make each interaction work for you.   

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